Bobby Lee Net Worth : Interesting facts, age, House, income, Biography

Bobby Lee Net Worth:$1 Million

et Worth:$1 Million
Date of Birth:Sep 17, 1972 (49 years old)
Gender:Male
Height:5 ft 4 in (1.64 m)
Profession:Actor, Screenwriter, Comedian, Voice Actor
Nationality:United States of America
(Photo by Monty Brinton/CBS via Getty Images)

Lee co-hosts the podcast TigerBelly with his girlfriend, Khalyla Kuhn; he is also co-host of the podcast Bad Friends with Andrew Santino.

Bobby Lee net worth:

Bobby Lee is an American actor and comedian who has a net worth of $1 million dollars.

Bobby Lee Biography

Bobby Lee Jr was born on September 17, 1971 in San Diego, California, and graduated from Poway High School.


Lee was born to Korean American parents Jeanie and Robert Lee. He and his younger brother Steve grew up in Poway, California.

Instead of joining his parent’s clothing retail company, he moved out when he was 18 , and began working in coffee shops and restaurants while studying at Palomar College.

From 2001 to 2009, Lee was a cast member on MADtv, and he co-starred in the ABC single-camera sitcom series Splitting Up Together alongside Jenna Fischer and Oliver Hudson between 2018 and 2019. Lee has also appeared in the films Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004), Pineapple Express (2008), and The Dictator (2012). He recently had a guest appearance as the cynical, burned-out Dr. Kang on FX on Hulu’s TV comedy series Reservation Dogs.

(Photo by Lester Cohen/WireImage)

He began working for The Comedy Store in San Diego, and decided to perform on one of their amateur nights. It proved to be a good decision, and he went on to open for other comedians such as Pauly Shore and Carlos Mencia.

From there, he began appearing at The Comedy Store in Los Angeles, and became a household name when he was cast on the sketch comedy show, “MADtv”, in 2001. In addition to appearing on “MADtv”, he has also played supporting roles in such films as, “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle”, “The Dictator”, and “Pineapple Express”.

Career


Lee worked various jobs at cafes and restaurants before pursuing a career in comedy. In 1994, the coffee shop where he was working abruptly closed.”I just went next door to get a job,” he said, “which was The Comedy Store in San Diego” (also known as the La Jolla Comedy Store).

After a few months of working odd jobs at the club, he decided to try stand-up during one of their amateur nights.Within a year of doing regular comedy sets, he received offers to open for both Pauly Shore and Carlos Mencia.Lee went on to work regularly at The Comedy Store in Los Angeles, a comedy club owned by Pauly Shore’s mother Mitzi.

Lee has said that his parents had hoped he would continue on with the family business and were less than supportive of his comedic pursuits at first.During a podcast interview conducted by fellow actor and comedian Joe Rogan on February 1, 2011, Lee stated that during the first few years he did stand-up his parents barely spoke to him, however after his appearance on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno his father called him and asked how much he had to pay to be on the show and then apologized for not supporting his comedy career.

Lee has included his family in some of his work; his younger brother has appeared in several non-speaking roles on MADtv, and his entire family has appeared in a sketch on the show. Lee also pitched a sitcom to Comedy Central in 2007 about a Korean family which was to star his own family.

Lee hosted the 9th MusiCares MAP Fund Benefit Concert in 2013.

In 2020, Lee began co-hosting the Bad Friends podcast with Andrew Santino.

MADtv


In 2001, Lee joined the cast of MADtv,making him the show’s first and only Asian cast member. He has publicly expressed that he dreaded playing the characters Bae Sung and Connie Chung, describing them as “Average Asian” skits.Lee remained with the cast until the series’ cancellation in 2009 and returned briefly when MADtv was revived in 2016 on The CW.

TigerBelly is a video podcast hosted by Bobby Lee and his girlfriend, Khalyla Kuhn, that they started in 2015, with appearances by technical engineer Gilbert Galon and producer George Kimmel. Kuhn became interested in doing podcasts of her own after she was a guest on the DVDASA podcast. The show’s intro song “Shadow Gook” was written and produced by Lee and performed by Lee and Kuhn.

The hosts discuss events from their lives and news topics from popular culture, often revolving around Asian American issues related to the entertainment industry, adolescence, sexuality, ethnicity, racism, and politics.

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