Top 10 interesting facts about Run Lola Run

Run Lola Run (German: Lola rennt) is a 1998 German experimental thriller film. The film was written and directed by Tom Tykwer, and stars Franka Potente as Lola and Moritz Bleibtreu as Manni.

The story narrates the journey of a woman who needs to obtain 100,000 Deutschmarks in twenty minutes to save her boyfriend’s life.

 Run Lola Run appeared with a great dazzling editing, techno music and a film school’s worth of cinematic techniques

It was directed by Tom Tykwer’s and the movie was sharp time-twisting action-comedy-thriller energized the German movie industry, broke out as an international hit and an example of independent film.

Run Lola Run screened at the Venice Film Festival, where it competed for the Golden Lion.

Tykwer frequently described Run Lola Run as “an experimental movie for a mass audience,” but he bristled at suggestions that it was simply an MTV-era confection meant for an attention-deficit audience.

Tykwer mentioned Pulp Fiction as an influence in a 1999 interview with the Chicago Tribune:

“You can say, ‘The truth is a matter of perspective,’ which is much more an element of Rashomon, but that’s not really the issue here. It’s more like, ‘What could your life become, and why does it go the way it goes?’ There’s a strong contradiction — a paradox — that I really like and wanted to keep in the movie. The reasons for Lola’s actions are so clear: If she doesn’t get the money in 20 minutes, someone dies. Everyone has been in situations where they have to say yes or no, and go for it.”

‘Run Lola Run’ became a meme before there were memes

“Run Lola Run experimented with a video-game formula of a woman trying to save her boyfriend’s life, but within the three sequences of the movie, something derails her and changes her outcomes. You could say a movie like Edge of Tomorrow would not have existed without Lola’s gumption,” Esquire noted in a 2014 story on the most influential films of 1999.

It was also selected as the German entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 71st Academy Awards

Edgar Wright made British TV series Spaced in 1999 and the beloved zombie-parody movie Shaun of the Dead in 2004, saw in Lola a seminal inspiration.

The film is based on themes such as free will vs. determinism, the role of chance in people’s destiny, and obscure cause-effect relationships.

Lola’s fleeting interactions with bystanders are revealed to have surprising and drastic effects on their future lives, serving as concise illustrations of chaos theory’s butterfly effect, in which minor, seemingly inconsequential variations in any interaction can blossom into much wider results than is often recognized.

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